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Kolbo Tips: Our Top 3 Ways to Tackle Candle Residue

February 10, 2020

Kolbo Tips: Our Top 3 Ways to Tackle Candle Residue


Our customers often ask us how to remove wax from the Shabbat candlestick sets and menorahs they choose from our gallery. After lots of trial and error, we have recently compiled a few quick and simple ways to tackle this job.   

1. Freeze

Freezing your metal menorah or candlesticks causes the wax to shrink and stiffen, making it easier to remove. Use a chopstick—or a baby spoon for softer wax—to break up any large chunks that remain in the container. Place the candle holder in the freezer for 15 minutes to an hour, or until it is frozen. Then, place the candle holder under warm (not hot) water, and the wax should pop right out of the container. Once all the surplus wax is removed, rinse with warm water and mild dishwashing liquid. Hand dry completely.

If your candle holders are ceramic or glass, do not put items into the freezer, as they might break. Instead, use an ice cube to freeze the wax areas, then loosen and remove.

2. Melt

This method works nicely if you have several candle holders to clean. Scrape out as much wax as you can with a chopstick or coated baby spoon to avoid scratching the surface. Heat oven to 180 degrees and line a baking pan with foil or parchment paper. Place the candleholders on the pan and set the pan in the oven. The wax will melt in about 15 minutes. Remove the pan and place on a heat-safe surface. Hold the container using a towel or pot holder and wipe the inside with a paper towel. 

If your candle holders are ceramic or glass, do not put items into the oven, as they might break or loosen an adhesive. Instead, use warm water on the wax areas, then loosen and remove.

Alternatively, you can also opt for using a handheld hair dryer on its hottest and highest setting. While this might take a little more elbow grease, it could be a better fit for those unsure of the oven method. Simply hold the candlesticks or menorah upside down over foil or parchment paper and allow the dryer to heat the wax until it drips off. 

3. Soak 

Soak the candlesticks or menorah in a hot water bath in the sink. The gentle heat helps to loosen and break up the wax. Then you can wipe it with a soft paper towel (VIVA brand works well) or gently scrape with a credit card. Avoid using harsh scrubbers like steel wool, as they might damage your precious work of art. Please note that the soaking method is NOT recommended for wooden candlesticks or menorahs. 

We encourage you to try any of the above methods to easily preserve and beautify your Judaica pieces for years to come. Let us know what worked best for you in the comments below!

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